Nova Scotia Health asking people to answer phone calls for COVID-19 info

Alonzo Osche

Health officials are asking Nova Scotians to answer their phones to prevent the spread of COVID-19 Nova Scotia Health is asking people to answer their phones as health officials try to contact those with COVID-19 or potentially exposed to the virus with information. “If you have had a recent COVID-19 test, have […]

Health officials are asking Nova Scotians to answer their phones to prevent the spread of COVID-19

Nova Scotia Health is asking people to answer their phones as health officials try to contact those with COVID-19 or potentially exposed to the virus with information.

“If you have had a recent COVID-19 test, have been identified as a close contact of someone that has COVID-19 or have a confirmed positive case of COVID-19, Nova Scotia Health is trying to call you with important information,” a news release said.

Phone calls could appear as an unknown caller or numbers from other parts of the province.

“Please answer these calls so the Nova Scotia Health team can provide important COVID-19 information,” the news release said. “This is vital in our fight against COVID-19 that Nova Scotians have the information they require to keep themselves and others safe.”

Moreover, Nova Scotia Health said it’s important that people taking symptomatic or asymptomatic COVID-19 tests ensure their phone numbers and email addresses are correct.

On Friday, May 7, Public Health announced it was starting to contact people with positive COVID-19 cases and potential exposures to the virus by text message.

However, Public Health will still contact people by phone call if a text message fails to deliver or if texts aren’t an option.

Saturday morning, infectious disease specialist Dr. Lisa Barrett said Public Health may take longer to contact people for the next few days.

She said all Nova Scotians should get tested for COVID-19, and those who have symptoms shouldn’t wait and should self-isolate.

She also said people should get weekly asymptomatic COVID-19 tests and that anyone who has tested positive but hasn’t received a call shouldn’t panic.

In the Halifax Regional Municipality, people can rapid COVID-19 tests on Saturday, May 8 at:

  • Alderney Gate Public Library, 60 Alderney Dr., Dartmouth from noon to 7 p.m.
  • Canada Games Centre, (entrance off larger parking lot) 26 Thomas Raddall Dr., Halifax from noon to 7 p.m.
  • Halifax Central Library, 5440 Spring Garden Rd., Halifax from noon to 7 p.m.
  • Halifax Convention Centre (Argyle St. entrance), 1650 Argyle St., Halifax from noon to 7 p.m
  • John Martin Junior High School, 7 Brule St. Dartmouth from noon to 7 p.m.
  • St. Andrews Community Centre, 3380 Barnstead Lane, Halifax from noon to 7 p.m

On Sunday, May 9 at:

  • Alderney Gate Public Library, 60 Alderney Dr., Dartmouth from noon to 7 p.m
  • Canada Games Centre, (entrance off larger parking lot) 26 Thomas Raddall Dr., Halifax from noon to 7 p.m.
  • Halifax Central Library, 5440 Spring Garden Rd., Halifax from noon to 7 p.m.
  • Halifax Convention Centre (Argyle St. entrance), 1650 Argyle St., Halifax from noon to 7 p.m.
  • John Martin Junior High School, 7 Brule St. Dartmouth from noon to 7 p.m.
  • St. Andrews Community Centre, 3380 Barnstead Lane, Halifax from noon to 7 p.m.

Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms should get tested at a Nova Scotia Health Authority testing site, not at a rapid testing site.

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